Video Games: Research and Conference

Posted under Research Blog.

In a study on video games and ADHD, Chan and Rabinowitz investigated whether there was a relationship between media use and and academic and social functioning.  72 students filled out the Youngs Internet Addiction Scale and their parents completed the Conners Parent Rating Scale.  The authors found that teens who play video games for more… Read more »

Hollywood Company Agrees to Anti-smoking Ads Before Movies

Posted under Research Blog.

In September, the Attorneys General of 41 states sent a letter to Hollywood’s 13 major movie studios asking them to include anti-smoking public service announcements (PSA’s) before any movie containing smoking.  The Weinstein Company is the first to take action on this letter, agreeing to insert a truth campaign PSA into its upcoming DVD release… Read more »

3 New Studies

Posted under Research Blog.

In a study of 80 children, Hager found no significant relationship between physical activity and television viewing.  He did find that boys who watched no TV were significantly more active after school than boys who watched any TV.  In another study about activity, Spinks et al found that 15% of a group of 500 children… Read more »

Controversy Over Game Ratings at Summit

Posted under Research Blog.

As I mentioned in a post earlier this week, Dr. Michael Rich, Director of CMCH, attended the National Video Game Summit in Minnesota this weekend.  Participants of the summit included researchers and representatives of the video game industry, who disagreed about whether the ratings system protects children from violent and sexually explicit content.  Many researchers… Read more »

Kaiser Forum on Reality TV

Posted under Research Blog.

On October 18th, CMCH Staff Scientist Dr. David Bickham spoke at the Kaiser Family Foundation forum titled "The Reality of Health: Reality Television and Public Health."  The report by Christenson and Ivancin concludes that there are two sides to health behavior portrayed on reality television: Positive results include: generating awareness about common health issues stimulating… Read more »

National Video Game Summit

Posted under Research Blog.

The National Video Game Summit, hosted by the National Institute on Media and the Family, will be held October 20-21st at the University of Minnesota.  CMCH Director, Dr. Michael Rich, will be a panelist on the Legislative Policy Panel.  During the meeting, researchers will: review current and emerging trends related to video game rating systems,… Read more »

Disney Goes Nutritious

Posted under Research Blog.

Walk into any supermarket with a child and you’ll soon hear "mommy, daddy, buy me this?" every time they see a familiar Disney character on a box.  Currently, these characters appear on high-sugar snacks like Pop-Tarts and fruit snacks.  But this will all change according to Disney’s new nutrition standards, to be enacted in 2008… Read more »

TV’s at the Hospital

Posted under Research Blog.

In a front page article in today’s Boston Globe, parenting columnist Barbara Meltz presents an interesting question:  When the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no television for children under the age of 2, should children’s hospitals have televisions available to patients in that age group?  CMCH Director, Dr. Michael Rich, offered his thoughts on the… Read more »

Medical Librarians Month — CMCH Featured!

Posted under Research Blog.

In celebration of National Medical Librarians Month, the National Library of Medicine has chosen to profile a number of projects happening in medical libraries around the country.  CMCH’s Smart Search engine has been chosen as a featured project for the New England area! 

3 Ways to Participate in the CMCH Blog

Posted under Research Blog.

While the CMCH blog is maintained by Brandy King, the CMCH librarian, readers are encouraged to participate in making this a unique information resource about news and research on media and child health.  Please consider participating in one of three ways: Send us news or research!  If you see or hear a news story on… Read more »