CMCH Staff Visits Michigan Schools

by Laura Mead | Escanaba Daily Press | April 28, 2008

Dr. David Bickham
and Dr. Ron Slaby
Staff Scientists at CMCH, visited Escanaba, Michigan, to present the results of “TV Turn-off” —
a program done at Escanaba Middle School and Bark River-Harris Junior High to reduce time spent watching TV.

The researchers’ goals were to evaluate the program’s success and to hear feedback from the students.


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Read the full article at Escanaba Daily Press.

Is the Internet separating new mothers and babies?

by Seetha Narayan | Boston Globe | April 21, 2008

New mothers find it challenging to balance their new motherhood

status with their Internet habit and find themselves using the Internet to access

information that otherwise would require them to get out of the house and socialize.


There are some concerns about heavy Internet use harming the new mother, her bond with the baby, and the baby’s development.

According to Dr. Michael Rich, Director of CMCH,
“time spent on the Web is associated with increased depression,” and recommends that new mothers take the
time to interact and talk with their children and other people face-to-face.



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Read the full article at Boston Globe.

CMCH’s Spring Cleaning featured on Newsweek’s TipSheet

by Newsweek | NewsWeek/TipSheet | April 19, 2008

The list of Spring Cleaning resources,
from the April issue of the CMCH e-Newsletter,
was featured on Newsweek’s TipSheet.


The list offers ideas how to go about recycling, donating and selling media and old electronics,
offers a variety of ideas and lists of agencies to get you excited about helping to save the environment,
while reducing the amount of media around the house.




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Read the full article at NewsWeek/TipSheet.

How Much TV is Too Much for Kids?

by Margaret Shortridge | Fox News Chicago | April 15, 2008


CMCH volunteer Beth Karnes spoke to Fox News in Chicago about how much TV is healthy for kids to watch. Ms. Karnes told them that “media
is not inherently bad; it’s how you use it.” She suggests four tips for parents that can help make watching TV less harmful:

  • talk to their kids about commercials
  • know what their kids are watching
  • set strict limits on the amount of time they can use the TV
  • keep the TV sets out of bedrooms

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Read the full article at Fox News Chicago.