Media and Aggression: New Studies in the Database of Research

Posted under Research Blog.

Violent media and aggression in youth is a prominent topic that draws a lot of attention and occasionally skepticism; however, scientific research has created a body of evidence that supports the link between violent media and aggression, desensitization, and anxiety. Recently, our own Dr. Michael Rich weighed in on how children learn from all aspects… Read more »

Research Wrap-Up: Recently Published Studies- March 5

Posted under Research Blog.

Check out these recently published studies on children, media, and health which explore a range of topics:   Anderson, C.A., et al.(2010). Violent video game effects on aggression, empathy, and prosocial behavior in Eastern and Western countries. Psychological Bulletin, 136(2), 151-73. The authors used meta-analytic procedures to test the effects of violent video games on… Read more »

Dr. Rich Answers Parents’ Questions

Posted under Research Blog.

CMCH Director, Dr. Michael Rich, is now answering questions about media and kids on Parents.com, the website of Parents magazine. There have been a number of interesting questions such as: I never thought I would even consider a gaming system for the family, but after seeing (and playing) the Nintendo Wii I am really thinking… Read more »

Media Violence Research and the FCC

Posted under Research Blog.

Due to the FCC’s forthcoming propsal to regulate violence on television, CMCH recently sent out a press release about our resources on media violence. The majority of studies over the last 50 years have concluded that media violence does have effects on the attitudes and behaviors of children and teens, ranging from increases in fear… Read more »

Video Games and Desensitization

Posted under Research Blog.

This week, Nicholas Carnagey, Craig Anderson and Brad Bushman released a new study on video games and desensitization.  They had over 250 college students randomly play one of 8 video games.  Half of the games were violent and half were nonviolent.  After they played the game for 20 minutes, they watched a 10 minute video… Read more »