Media Exposure Feeding Children’s Violent Acts, AAP says

by American Academy of Pediatrics | AAP News | January 1, 2002


According to the revised Media Violence policy statement by the American Academy of Pediatrics, “playing violent video
games accounts for a 13% to 22% increase in adolescent’s violent behavior.”

Dr. Michael Rich
, a member of the AAP Committee on Public Education who helped write the policy statement, commented “There are many
demands made on pediatricians’ time. Media is just one of the things we have to
introduce to families…we should at least let parents know to pay attention to their children’s media exposure.”
Read the full article at AAP News.

How Media Violence Touches Children

by Misia Landau | Focus | October 26, 2001

“The televised images of hijacked planes making their deadly arcs on Sept. 11 gave parents a special worry:
how would their children react to the sight of the planes plowing, over and over, into the twin towers?
Some may have breathed a sigh of relief to hear recent reports that many kids were less
upset than had been expected.” Dr. Michael Rich
is not relieved.


“I think the reason kids aren’t bothered that much by the recent images is they’re desensitized,” he said. “We don’t know how this is
going to play itself out. Will it show itself in hopelessness and depression years later?”




» See Full Story
Read the full article at Focus.

Pediatrician Testifies on Impact of Sexuality in Media

by American Academy of Pediatrics | AAP News | October 1, 2001

Dr. Michael Rich, Director of CMCH, represented the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Public Education at a Senate forum on July 26, 2001, where he testified on how sexually explicit media impact young people.

“’Young people tell me that the media is one of their leading sources of information about sex,’ said Dr. Rich. ‘Each year television and movies offer 14,000 sexual portrayals, of which only 165 deal with risks of pregnancy, HIV, or other STDs.’”

» See Dr. Rich’s Bio
Read the full article at AAP News.

Dr. Rich Goes to Washington

by Children's Hospital Boston | Children's News | September 7, 2001

Dr. Michael Rich was invited to Capitol Hill to testify before Congress about entertainment ratings and how sexually explicit media affects children’s health.
» See Dr. Rich’s Bio
Read the full article at Children's News.

Medical Lessons on Videotape

by ABC News | ABC News | December 16, 2000

“In a perfect world, doctors know a lot about the science of treating asthma in children. But children with asthma live in the real world – where doctors can’t always control what they do or the circumstances of their lives.”

Dr. Michael Rich, director of Video Intervention/Prevention Assessment (VIA) at CMCH uses videotapes created by his patients to learn how their chronic illness is managed in real life.

“’What I do is hand a patient a video camcorder and say, teach me about asthma,’ Rich says. ‘I can tell them what the science says about asthma. What I cant tell them is what it does to them and their lives.’”
Read the full article at ABC News.

Benefits of Computers for Children Questioned

by Carl Sherman | Pediatric News | December 1, 2000

In a recent 100 page report, the Alliance for Childhood says that the educational value of computers for children is
an “untested premise.” The group has urged a comprehensive examination by the surgeon general on the “physical, emotional, and developmental
hazards computers may pose, and an immediate moratorium on their further introduction in early childhood and elementary education.”

Dr. Michael Rich
commented “It’s absolutely correct that there’s no substantive evaluation on whether computers are a good, bad, or neutral
thing in the classroom, but a moratorium is not feasible.”

He continued, “I worry about intruding on childhood with a machine that says, ‘there’s a right and wrong answer, and we’ll sit you down until we get the right answer.'”
Read the full article at Pediatric News.

Lights. Action. Asthma.

by Elizabeth Gudrais | Harvard Magazine | November 1, 2000

“Medical histories can be rather dry affairs: a doctor at a desk interviews a patient while filling out a dorm. Suppose instead the patients recorder their medical histories, using videotape shot at home, outdoors, everywhere – and could take a few weeks to do the job.”

Dr. Michael Rich, director of Video Intervention/Prevention Assessment (VIA) at CMCH has had his patients do just that.

» Go to VIA website
Read the full article at Harvard Magazine.

Toughening Video-Game Measures

by Committee on Finance | Chicago City Council | October 31, 2000

“This past summer, the city of Indianapolis became the first city in the nation to require kids to have a parent present when playing
video games at arcades that featured violent or sexually explicit content.” Chicago’s Alderman Burke is seeking a similar law for
his city, and is even considering amendments that would make it illegal to sell or rent violent games to minors.


Dr. Michael Rich
testified before the council, saying “We have a powerful teaching tool here. The question is ‘What are our children learning?'”




» See Dr. Rich’s Testimony
Read the full article at Chicago City Council.

Should Government Regulate Video Games?

by ABC News | ABC 7 Chicago News | October 31, 2000

A recent proposal by the Chicago City Council would limit the accessibility of violent video games to children.

Dr. Michael Rich
provided
testimony before the Council, saying that “all the available research on violent video games says that they desensitize and promote
violent acts among those who play particularly those who play them most — children.”



» See Dr. Rich’s Testimony and Full Story
Read the full article at ABC 7 Chicago News.