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In a study of 80 children, Hager found no significant relationship between physical activity and television viewing.  He did find that boys who watched no TV were significantly more active after school than boys who watched any TV. 

In another study about activity, Spinks et al found that 15% of a group of 500 children failed to meet the Australian guidelines of 60 minutes of activity per day.  These 15% were significantly more likely than those who met the recommendation to watch more than 2 hours of television per day and to use the computer for entertainment.

Hardy et al used survey data of 2,750 teens to learn about their use of small screen media — television, DVDs, videos, and computers.  In the elementary school population, they found that 53% of students used small screen media for more than 2 hours per day.  Rural boys used more media than urban boys, and overweight girls used more media than healthy-weight girls.  For the high school population, they found that 72% of students used small screen media more than 2 hours per day.  Rural boys used less media than urban boys, and girls from low socioeconomic backgrounds used more media than girls from higher socioeconomic backgrounds.  Overall, they found that the majority of students exceeded the recommended 2 hour limit on small screen media use.

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