Posted

Here is a list of recently published studies on children, media, and health which explore a range of topics:

Calamaro, C.J., Mason, T.,& Ratcliffe, S.J. (2009). Adolescents living the 24/7 lifestyle: Effects of caffeine and technology on sleep duration and daytime functioning. Pediatrics, 123(6), e1005-e1010.

  • To explore the relationship between new media technology and new,
    popular energy drinks  which may impact sleep duration in adolescents.

Evans, W. D., Davis, K.C., Ashley, O.L.,  Blitstein, J., Koo,  H., & Zhang, Y. (2009). Efficacy of abstinence promotion media messages: Findings from an online randomized trial. Journal of Adolescent Health, Available Online 1 June.

  • To evaluate the efficacy of messages from the Parents Speak Up
    National Campaign (PSUNC) to promote parent–child communication about
    sex.

Ko, C., Yen, J.,  Liu, S., Huang, C. & Yen, C. (2009). The associations between aggressive behaviors and internet addiction and online activities in adolescents. Journal of Adolescent Health, 44(6),598-605.

  • To evaluate (a) the association between Internet addiction and
    aggressive behaviors, as well as the moderating effects of gender,
    school, and depression on this association; and (b) to evaluate the
    association between Internet activities and aggressive behaviors.

Okuma, K. & Tanimura, M.
(2009). A preliminary study on the relationship between characteristics
of TV content and delayed speech development in young children. Infant Behavior and Development, In Press, Corrected Proof, Available online 26 May 2009.

  • To explore the association between delayed language development and heavy TV viewing in toddlers.

Vogel, I., Verschuure, H., van der Ploeg, C., Brug, J. & and Raat, H. (2009). Adolescents and MP3 players: Too many risks, too few precautions. Pediatrics, 123(6), e953-e958.

  • To assess risky and protective listening behaviors of adolescent
    users of MP3 players and the association of these behaviors with
    demographic characteristics and frequency of use.
*****

Use the free CMCH Database of Research to find other studies on children, media, and health.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.