Children’s Safety vs. Free Speech?

Posted under Research Blog.

On Wednesday, California will once again bring to the courts the question of whether to bar the sale or rental of violent video games to minors. The Mercury New reports that supporters intend to protect children from the negative effects of exposure to media violence. Opponents, however, say that the law is unconstitutional and claim… Read more »

Does TV Violence Affect Children of Different Races and Genders Differently?

Posted under Research Blog.

Many studies have explored the relationship between kids’ exposure to media violence and harmful health effects, but there has been little research into whether these effects tend to differ depending on the viewer’s gender or race. A study published in September’s Perspectives on Psychological Science brings some new evidence to the table. Researchers found that,… Read more »

Violence on YouTube

Posted under Research Blog.

A gunman opened fire in a Finnish school Tuesday, killing 10 students and himself. The AP reports that the suspect posted threatening videos on YouTube the day before the shooting, which prompted police questioning but not confiscation of his gun. The event brought renewed attention to YouTube’s policy about posting threatening videos. Although the site… Read more »

Youth Make Media to Fight Violence

Posted under Research Blog.

Starting this fall, Boston youth will take to the streets–with video cameras and tape recorders. There they will capture words and images from their communities, which they will use to create an anti-violence media campaign through the city’s Violence Intervention and Prevention (VIP) Initiative. An article in Monday’s Boston Globe explained that this project will… Read more »

Strict Regulations on Video Game Labels: A Real Need?

Posted under Research Blog.

A recent bill to label violent video games content was signed on Tuesday, June 22 by New York Governor David Paterson. This bill includes three new measures: It establishes an advisory council to study  “the connection between interactive media and real-life violence in minors exposed to such media” It requires new video game consoles to… Read more »

Can a Doctor Visit Help Prevent Violence?

Posted under Research Blog.

A stray bullet from a teenager’s gun, which hit a 7-year-old Boston-area boy yesterday afternoon, is a painful reminder of the violence that has become a daily concern in communities around the country. The problem is particularly salient when it involves young people, which it often does: Homicide is the second-leading cause of death among… Read more »

Women are Sex Objects and Black Men are Thugs?

Posted under Research Blog.

Since last week’s release of Grand Theft Auto IV, there has been an upsurge in concern about how violence in video games affects those who play them. But it’s not only their violence that’s raising eyebrows— concern is also mounting over their use of stereotypes. A Boston Globe article addresses the “growing number of gamers… Read more »

Grand Theft Auto: Typical Controversy

Posted under Research Blog.

The Grand Theft Auto video game series sparks controversy every time a new game is released, and Tuesday’s release of the 4th game will likely follow the same pattern.  First week revenue is expected to reach $360 million.  Following a storyline that offers players the chance to drive recklessly (and in this new version, drunk),… Read more »

Eyes on (Cyber)Bullying

Posted under Research Blog.

As internet use and other electronic forms of communication have become increasingly prevalent among young people, a new form of bullying has been on the rise: cyberbullying. This form of bullying involves “posting hurtful, embarrassing, or threatening text or images using the Internet, cell phones, or other communication devices.” And as difficult as any bullying… Read more »

Boston Regulating Video Games?

Posted under Research Blog.

Massachusetts lawmakers are considering a measure to limit the sales of violent video games to minors.  Several other states including Illinois, Louisiana, Minnesota, Michigan and California, have attempted similar measures but have all been denied because of Constitutional conflicts. Dr. Michael Rich, Director of CMCH, was interviewed for a newscast and a podcast on this… Read more »