Research Wrap-Up: Recently Published Studies-June 29

Posted under Research Blog.

New published studies on children, media, and health which explore a range of topics: Carson, V.; Spence, J.C.; Cutumisu, N. &  Cargill, L. (2010). Association between neighborhood socioeconomic status and screen time among pre-school children: A cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health. 10(1), 367. Available online June 24. FREE ARTICLE The authors found that girls living… Read more »

Research Wrap-Up: Recently Published Studies-April 9

Posted under Research Blog.

Check out these recently published studies on children, media, and health which explore a range of topics: Chia, S.C. (2010). How social influence mediates media effects on adolescents’ materialism.Communication Research, Available online April 7. This study proposed a theoretical framework by which it can be identified how media influence and social influence interplay and produce… Read more »

Research Toolbox: New Book on Children and Television

Posted under Research Blog.

  Professor Dafna Lemish, editor of the Journal of Children and Media, incoming Chair of the Department of Radio-Television in the College of Mass Communication and Media Arts at Southern Illinois University, and visiting scholar at CMCH, has published a new book, Screening Gender on Children’s Television: The Views of Producers Around the World (Routledge,… Read more »

Can I blame the “Slut List” on all the sex in the media?

Posted under Ask the Mediatrician.

Q: I’ve been hearing about the high school in NJ where older girls are putting freshman girls’ names on a “slut list”—and the worst part is that being on the list is considered a good thing! I can’t help thinking that all the sex in the media is to blame for girls thinking it’s a badge of honor, but maybe I’m overreacting. I want to talk to my 13 year old daughter about this, but what should I say?
Answered by Dr. Michael Rich, The Mediatrician

Are American Girl dolls a better choice for my niece than the more sexualized Barbies or Bratz?

Posted under Ask the Mediatrician.

Q: I wondered if the Center has any research on the American Girls phenomenon. Unlike Barbies and Bratz, these dolls are not sexualized, and they also have connections to history and culture through each doll’s storybook. I am guessing that they are probably a better alternative for playtime fantasies (at least for families who can afford them — the dolls cost $95 each). But they are also linked to all kinds of merchandising, encouraging families to buy accessories like furniture, clothes, and even pets to go along with them (also pricey). What do you think about the pros and cons? My niece is 8 years old and I am thinking ahead to the holiday season.
Answered by Dr. Michael Rich, The Mediatrician