Are You Saying I’m Fat?

Posted under Research Blog.

Himes and Thompson performed a content analysis of television and movie scenes where overweight people were made fun of.  They found that "fat stigmatization commentary" was often verbal and often stated in the presence of the overweight person.  They also found that male characters were 3 times more likely than female characters to engage in… Read more »

Television & Sedentary Behavior and Other New Research

Posted under Research Blog.

In a study of 88 boys and girls who wore accelerometers and recorded their TV viewing habits, Roemmich et al found an association between the television access a child had in his or her home and their level of sedentary behavior.  Other new media research: Barr, R. et al. The effect of repetition on imitation… Read more »

TV Increases Food Intake and Other Research

Posted under Research Blog.

In an experiment, Temple et al found that children watching television ate more food and ate for longer periods of time than children not watching television.  This reminded me of a similar study done by Blass et al  where they found that college students ate more pizza and mac & cheese when they watched TV… Read more »

2 Studies: Couch Potatoes, Unwanted Porn

Posted under Research Blog.

Two studies in this month’s Pediatrics have made national headlines today: Reuters reported that getting kids to shut off the TV doesn’t necessarily mean they will be more physically active.  CMCH researcher Dr. Alison Field was part of the research team on a four-year study of 10,000 early adolescents.  Although over time, the teens watched… Read more »

Media Reduction Interventions to Target Obesity – New Research

Posted under Research Blog.

Two new studies this month have focused on creating media reduction interventions in order to target obesity: Baker, I.R., Dennison, B.A., et al. (2007). "An asset-based community initiative to reduce television viewing in New York state." Preventive Medicine. Zabinski, M.F., Norman, G.J., et al. (2007). "Patterns of sedentary behavior among adolescents." Health Psychology. Two other… Read more »

Dance Dance Revolution: Weight Loss Aid?

Posted under Research Blog.

Should the video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) be part of your strategy for this year’s weight-loss resolutions? Two recent studies have looked to DDR as a means of weight loss and found that theoretically, playing the game could work to decrease obesity: Lanningham-Foster et al found that children expended twice as much energy using… Read more »

TV Linked to Fast Food Intake and Other New Research

Posted under Research Blog.

In a new study in Obesity, researchers found that with every hour of television a preschool child watched, they were more likely to eat fast food more than once a week.  Dr. Don Goldmann, Chair of the CMCH Advisory Board, was one of the authors of this study. The December issue of Pediatrics is chock… Read more »

Video Games Cause “Unintended” Exercise

Posted under Research Blog.

Early users of Nintendo’s new Wii game system were surprised by sore muscles after playing hours of sports video games.  The control for the system looks like a typical TV remote-control, but responds to motion, such as swinging a bat or boxing against an opponent.  The system comes with a package of 5 sports games:… Read more »

3 New Studies

Posted under Research Blog.

In a study of 80 children, Hager found no significant relationship between physical activity and television viewing.  He did find that boys who watched no TV were significantly more active after school than boys who watched any TV.  In another study about activity, Spinks et al found that 15% of a group of 500 children… Read more »

Disney Goes Nutritious

Posted under Research Blog.

Walk into any supermarket with a child and you’ll soon hear "mommy, daddy, buy me this?" every time they see a familiar Disney character on a box.  Currently, these characters appear on high-sugar snacks like Pop-Tarts and fruit snacks.  But this will all change according to Disney’s new nutrition standards, to be enacted in 2008… Read more »