Perspective on Sexting: Part II – Photo Sharing Behavior

Posted under Research Blog.

This is the second installment of an examination of the phenomenon of sexting by guest blogger Dr. Richard Chalfen.  >>See part I: Teen Culture>>See part III: Reactions and Responses How and when did young people give pictures to one another in the past?  We know that historically young couples swapped pictures of themselves by exchanging… Read more »

Perspective on Sexting: Part I – Teen Culture

Posted under Research Blog.

A few weeks ago, we blogged about "sexting", which is the new term for when people send sexual text and picture messages to others.  This has been sweeping the news, especially since some teens have been hit with child pornography charges. CMCH Senior Scientist Dr. Richard Chalfen has been investigating the use of cell phones… Read more »

Sexting = Sexual Texting

Posted under Research Blog.

A new trend of sending sexual texts and pictures via cell phone has lead to a number of teens being charged with child pornography.  In addition to the legal questions here, there are several sexual and emotional health concerns. A survey from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy shows that 20% of… Read more »

Discussing Risky Behavior Online is…Well…Risky

Posted under Research Blog.

This month’s issue of Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine includes two related studies about teens’ online discussion of their own risk behaviors, whether real or invented, in the real world. Researchers at Seattle Children’s Research Institute conducted both studies. One study found that most teens do discuss sex, substance use, or violence on social… Read more »

What I Learned at the CCFC Summit

Posted under Research Blog.

On Friday, I presented at the Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood’s Annual Summit.  My talk about research on media and sex was well-attended and lead to some great discussion among participants.  I wanted to post about a few resources I became aware of through the Summit and pass them on to CMCH blog readers,… Read more »

Let’s Talk About Sex(ual content)

Posted under Research Blog.

CMCH Librarian Brandy King will be presenting at the 6th Annual Summit of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood.  The Summit will take place April 3rd-5th at Wheelock College, and will focus on the theme "Consuming Kids: The Sexualization of Children and Other Commercial Calamities."  Ms. King will present research about sex and media followed… Read more »

Hip-Hop, Sex, and Gender Dynamics

Posted under Research Blog.

A recent New York Times article explored a 3 year study of the hip-hop club scene in NY city.  Munoz-Laboy et al observed dancing and behavior at these clubs and ran interviews with young men and women.  They were surprised to find that even with the sexual and often misogynistic overtones of the music, young… Read more »

Learning Scripts for Romance

Posted under Research Blog.

After a few weeks off, the CMCH blog is back!  There is much new research to cover over the next few days.  One new study by Rivadeneyra and Lebo examined 215 high schoolers to learn whether television affected their dating behavior.  They found that: Teens who watched romantic TV shows were more likely to have… Read more »

Online Bullying and Sexual Harassment Studies

Posted under Research Blog.

There are two new studies on the Internet in this month’s Journal of Adolescent Health: Prevalence and Frequency of Internet Harassment Instigation: Implications for Adolescent Health. by Ybarra, M. L., & Mitchell, K. J. Using data from a survey of 1500 teens, researchers found that 6% reported being frequent perpetrators of online harassment, 6% reported… Read more »

2 Studies: Couch Potatoes, Unwanted Porn

Posted under Research Blog.

Two studies in this month’s Pediatrics have made national headlines today: Reuters reported that getting kids to shut off the TV doesn’t necessarily mean they will be more physically active.  CMCH researcher Dr. Alison Field was part of the research team on a four-year study of 10,000 early adolescents.  Although over time, the teens watched… Read more »