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Check out recently published studies on children, media, and health which explore a range of topics:

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2011). Media use by children younger than 2 years. Pediatrics. Available Online October 17. FULL TEXT.

  • This policy statement reaffirms the 1999 statement with respect to media use in infants and children younger than 2 years and provides updated research findings to support it.

Cao, H., Sun, Y., Wan, Y., et al. (2011). Problematic Internet use in Chinese adolescents and its relation to psychosomatic symptoms and life satisfaction. BMC Public Health, 11(1), 802. FULL TEXT.

  • The study authors found that problematic Internet use (PIU) is common among Chinese students, and PIU was significantly associated with psychosomatic symptoms and life satisfaction

Coyne, S.M., Stockdale, L.A., Nelson, D.A., et al. (2011). Profanity in media associated with attitudes and behavior regarding profanity use and aggression. Pediatrics. Available Online October 17. FULL TEXT.

  • The results revealed a positive association between exposure to profanity in multiple forms of media and beliefs about profanity, profanity use, and engagement in physical and relational aggression.

Huotilainen, M., Lovio, R., Kujala, T., et al. (2011). Could audiovisual training be used to improve cognition in extremely low birth weight children? Acta Paediatrica, 100(11), 1489-1494.

  • The researchers found that although all children did not complete the protocol, the results suggest that training with Audilex dyslexia programme might be beneficial for enhancing neural-level sound discrimation and possibly reading skills in extremely low birth children.

Mulvaney, S.A., Rothman, R.L., Dietrich, M.S. et al. (2011). Using mobile phones to measure adolescent diabetes adherence. Health Psychology, Available Online October 3.

  • The study authors found that mobile phones provide a feasible method to measure glucose monitoring and insulin administration in adolescents, given a limited assessment duration.

Use the free CMCH Database of Research to find other studies on children, media, and health.

One Response to “Research Wrap-Up: Recently Published Studies-Oct.18”

  1. Rodney C. Davis

    Even after reading the PIU I’m still convinced that the relationship is not causal. Both the psychosomatic and the physical problems that developed appear to me to be caused by inadequate attention to diet, sleep, exercise, and normative social interaction. To me, saying that use of the internet caused all this is like saying that the spanking new car destroyed my marriage because I couldn’t stay away from it for more than a few hours at a time. Someone please correct me if I’m wrong in saying that this is socially accepted to say, but isn’t scientifically, that relationship is spurious.

    Reply

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